Groupthink, Loafing and the romance of teams. Questioning the emphasis on collaboration.

As far back as 1972, in his now classic book, Victims of Groupthink, Yale psychology researcher Irving Janis theorizes that groups often breed a false confidence that leads to unsound decisions none of the individuals in the group would have made on their own. In the 1990s, research by Purdue psychology researcher Kip Williams shed light on “social loafing”–that is, the tendency of people in groups simply to not try as hard as individuals. In fact, the notion that individuals outthink and outdecide groups is so well established among experts that they don’t bother to study it anymore. Instead, the hot question among psychologists and organizational behaviorists is why the rest of us persist in keeping this wrong-headed notion alive. “We’ve been trying to find out what seduces us into thinking teams are so wonderful,” says Natalie Allen, a psychologist at the University of Western Ontario who has studied what she calls “the romance of teams.”

Read What’s Next: The Idiocy of Crowds from Inc.com. Previously from WNM: Digital Maoism: The Hazards of the New Online Collectivism.

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