How do statute of limitations apply to Internet “documents”

Here’s where it gets interesting: Nationwide then claimed that the statute of limitations had not run out, because “a republication of the article occurs every time an Internet user types Nationwide’s name into a search engine and retrieves the article, so that each ‘hit’ triggers the statue of limitations.” Of course, this is like claiming that finding the article in a microfilmed back issue of the paper somehow amounts to “republication,” and means that the statute of limitations might never run out.

Read this article from Ars Technica

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Filed under Regulation, The Politics of New Media, When New Meets Old

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